FRIENDS OF HACKNEY LIBRARY
Archive of Activities Sponsored by the Friends (2007 - )


  Friends' Sponsored Activities--2013

January 22, 2013: Book Signing: Author and CEO Garland S. Tucker, III:

Image of author and CEO Garland S. Tucker, III (Photo Credit: Bachrach)

Some 60 attendees gathered on Tuesday, January 22, 5:30-7:00 pm to welcome to campus author Garland S. Tucker, III for a book signing in Hackney Library. The event was sponsored by the Friends of Hackney Library.

Tucker is the author of The High Tide of American Conservatism: Davis, Coolidge, and the 1924 Election (Emerald, 2010). He is also President and CEO of Triangle Capital Corporation, a publicly traded specialty finance company in Raleigh, North Carolina. Copies of his book were available for purchase at the event, which was free and open to the public. Refreshments were provided.

Although he currently lives and works in Raleigh, Garland S. Tucker, III, is a native son of Wilson; his grandfather, Garland S. Tucker, Sr., established the Tucker Furniture chain that is still run by members of the Tucker family. Tucker graduated magna cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa, from Washington and Lee University and received an MBA degree from Harvard Business School. He is a former member of the New York Stock Exchange and also serves on the boards of a number of companies, schools, and charitable organizations.

The High Tide of American Conservatism takes a fresh look at the presidential election of 1924 between candidates John W. Davis and Calvin Coolidge, both of whom "articulately expounded a similar philosophy of limited government and maximum individual freedom; and both men were exemplary public servants," according to a description of the book.

Cover image of 'The High Tide of American Conservatism' by Garland S. Tucker IIIIn a September 23, 2010 interview with Roger Aronoff on the "Take AIM" radio show on BlogTalkRadio, Tucker explains how, as a non-historian, he came to write High Tide:

…I have been a lifelong student of history, I guess--certainly love to read history, and one of the periods that I've grown to be interested in was the 1920s. From a business standpoint, as a businessman, I've gotten intrigued with the fiscal policies of the Coolidge and Mellon administration, and, really, felt that they have been very much overlooked and/or misunderstood by most historians over the years. Similarly, I developed an interest in John Davis, and think it's very sad that, as an individual, he's been totally overlooked--or almost totally overlooked--by historians. That was, I guess, the genesis of the book.

A variety of critics have praised Tucker's book:

  • George Gallup, historian and author, says "[a]s a pollster, who has for many years studied the shifting tides in political thought in the nation, I found Garland Tucker's book to be enormously helpful in shedding new light on the 1924 Davis/Coolidge presidential race and to its underlying meaning and significance."
  • Steve Forbes, chairman and CEO of Forbes Media, calls the book "[a] well-told tale of one of the most extraordinary and long forgotten Presidential elections in American history….Author Tucker has written a fascinating account of a contest we won't likely see replicated again."
  • The Wall Street Journal's Daniel Henninger states that "anyone seeking clarity about what's at stake [in the 2012 presidential election] needs to know what happened to our politics in 1924….And Garland S. Tucker III's book is a perfect guide."
  • Fred Barnes, Executive Editor of The Weekly Standard and political contributor for FOX News Channel, commends Tucker's achievement: "That historians have largely failed to understand the significance of that election points to what Tucker has accomplished as a non-historian. His revisionist account not only upgrades the election in historical terms, but it also casts a fresh light on Coolidge and Davis."

View our Facebook photo album for images from the event.

March 26, 2013: Spring 2013 Dinner / Lecture Program, Featuring Children's Book Author/Illustrator Rosemary Wells:

Image of author/illustrator Rosemary Wells in her studio This year's Spring 2013 program, held on Tuesday, March 26, was unique in that it featured two distinct events for two different audiences: One for children, which was free; the other for adults, which was ticketed. Both events featured renowned children's author and illustrator Rosemary Wells:

FOR CHILDREN: "Story Time with Rosemary Wells"

Because of Rosemary Wells's particular appeal for children, a completely separate, special "Story Time with Rosemary Wells" specifically intended for children was held from 4-5 pm in Barton College's Hackney Library prior to the adult book signing/dinner.

Cover image of one of author/illustrator Rosemary Wells' latest books, 'Max and Ruby's Treasure Hunt' Wells read one of her latest books, Max and Ruby's Treasure Hunt, to well over 100 children and parents/grandparents present. Attendance was free at the "Story Time" event. During "Story Time," copies of Wells's books were available for the children or their parent/guardian to purchase, and the author signed books and had some good one-on-one time with the children as well.

FOR ADULTS: Book Signing/Wine Reception & Dinner/Program

The traditional adult program was held in Barton College’s Hardy Alumni Hall. The event began with a wine reception and book signing at 6 pm, followed by dinner and the program at 7:00 pm. Copies of Wells’s books were available for purchase at the adult book signing as well. The adult program was a ticketed event with some 100 attendees.

Wells’s career as a multi-award winning author and illustrator spans over 40 years and more than 150 books, so naming her best-loved characters is an almost impossible feat, but certainly the list would include bunny Max and his bossy older sister Ruby; Yoko, the Japanese kitten; and Noisy Nora the mouse, among many others. Several characters reappear in various series, including the Max and Ruby series, the Yoko and Friends School Days series, the Voyage to the Bunny Planet series, and others. Among numerous other awards, many of Wells’s books have received the American Library Association’s (ALA) Notable Book citations or American Bookseller “Pick of the Lists” citations, or have been named among School Library Journal’s best books of the year.

In addition to her self-illustrated books, Wells has authored books illustrated by others, including the series illustrated by collaborator Susan Jeffers about the beloved McDuff, the West Highland terrier inspired by Wells’s own pet, and Wingwalker, a book for slightly older readers that was illustrated by Brian Selznick. Conversely, she has illustrated a number of books written by other notable children’s authors, including Paula Fox, Robert W. Service, and Marjorie Weinman Sharmat. She has also adapted and illustrated classic folktales in picture book form.

Although she is perhaps best-known for her toddler board books and children’s picture books, Wells has also written and won acclaim for several young adult novels. In addition, she has ventured into nonfiction books for children and young adults, including several biographies of historical as well as contemporary women, among others.

Image of one of author/illustrator Rosemary Wells' classic books, 'My Very First Mother Goose' Wells’s picture books for children often include anthropomorphic animals as characters. Her inspiration for themes has often come from observing her own children’s behavior or from her own experiences as a youth. According to Gerard J. Senick, common themes explored in her work include “childhood dilemmas or comic predicaments such as sibling rivalry, bedtime fears, inattentive parents, being embarrassed in class, and dealing with bullies or a new baby-sitter” (Something About The Author, vol. 114, p. 227). Wells “is often celebrated for capturing the essence of child behavior in books that are eloquent, witty, and affirming,” asserts Senick. “[She] is generally regarded as a gifted author/artist who seamlessly combines humor and panache in books that appeal to, and have a devoted following among, both children and adults” (p. 227).

A later entry about Wells in Something About the Author notes that “[a]s an artist, Wells favors line and watercolor; she is often praised for her rich use of color and for creating deceptively simple drawings that are filled with nuance and expression” (vol. 156, p. 189).

Image of one of author/illustrator Rosemary Wells' newest books, 'Ivy Takes Care' Born in New York City but raised on the New Jersey shore, Wells began drawing at the age of two. As she says on her web site: “Very early on I knew I would be an artist one day. Drawing and painting was what I loved to do best in the world. Not until I was in my twenties did I think I would be a writer too.”

Wells entered the Boston Museum School to study art at the age of nineteen and then left art school shortly thereafter for gainful employment after marrying husband Tom Wells. She became an art editor and designer, first with textbook publisher Allyn and Bacon in Boston, and then, following a move to New York City, with the children’s books division of Macmillan. After hearing a song from a Gilbert and Sullivan opera, she made an illustrated dummy of the lyrics and gave it to Macmillan editor-in-chief Susan Hirschman, who after viewing it, proclaimed her not just an art editor but a Macmillan author (Contemporary Authors: New Revision Series, vol. 120, p. 422). The dummy became her first published book, A Song to Sing, O! (Macmillan, 1969).

Image of one of author/illustrator Rosemary Wells' newest books, 'Following Grandfather' And the rest is history (and quite a long one, at that). But Wells is not resting on her laurels. To the contrary, in addition to documenting the latest of Max and Ruby's latest exploits, she has recently completed two more children’s books : Following Grandfather, a story about Jenny, a young mouse who is grieving over the death of her beloved Grandfather (written by Wells and illustrated by Christopher Denise, it was published in September 2012); and Ivy Takes Care (written by Wells and illustrated by Jim LaMarche, it was released in February 2013).

Not only is she a well-renowned author and illustrator, Rosemary Wells is also a passionate advocate of literacy programs. She has supported the “Twenty Minutes a Day” campaign, which advocates parents’ reading to their children twenty minutes each day. She also read her 1998 book Read to Your Bunny at the opening reception for the nationwide Prescription for Reading Partnership program (Something About the Author, Vol. 156, p. 192). Her web site has a special “Read to Your Bunny” section with speeches and downloadable resources in support of children’s literacy.

Wells currently resides in Connecticut.

See images from both the children's and adult events on our Facebook page.

April 16, 2013: Book Signing Featuring Co-Authors and Health/Science Communications Experts Stephanie Barnard and Deborah St James:

Image of co-authors Deborah St James (left) and Stephanie Roberson Barnard

On Tuesday, April 16, 2013, the Friends of Hackney Library welcomed co-authors Stephanie Roberson Barnard and Deborah St James to campus for a book signing from 5:30-7:00 pm in Hackney Library. Barnard and St James, communications consultants and speakers as well as authors, specialize in facilitating communication skills among science, health, and technology professionals.

Refreshments were served at the book signing, which was free and open to the public.

Barnard and St James addressed the gathering of some 40 students, faculty, and community members for a mini communication skills workshop at 6 pm, followed by a time for questions. Some of the issues they addressed in their mini workshop included the following:

  • How to be an influential speaker in meetings, job interviews, and small group settings
  • How to communicate to save time and increase understanding without compromising content
  • How to be more persuasive when you communicate with others who disagree with your view

Cover image of St James and Barnard's book 'Listen.Write.Present' The two communications experts, who have collaborated since 1996, are the co-authors of two books from Yale University Press. The most recent is Listen. Write. Present: The Elements for Communicating Science and Technology (2012).

The book has received high praise from a variety of reviewers. Abraham Verghese, MD, professor of medicine at Stanford University and the acclaimed author of the novel Cutting for Stone, says of the book, “So often we are judged not by what we know, but by what people think we know based on our presentations and our ability to communicate. This lovely book will serve the tyro [novice] and the pro alike. It will be on my bookshelf.” Michele Vivirito, Fellow of the American Medical Writers Association, says that “With its engaging, conversational style, this little book is an important, new resource for its intended readers, who seldom receive academic training in communication skills.”

They are also co-authors of Writing, Speaking, and Communication Skills for Health Professionals (2001), which won the 2002 Will Solimene Award for Excellence in Medical Communication and the 2002 Allied Health Medical Book Award, both from the American Medical Writers Association.

Copies of both books were available for purchase at the event.

Image of Stephanie Roberson Barnard As a communication consultant, Stephanie Roberson Barnard has trained thousands of pharmaceutical industry professionals on how to be more effective speakers, writers, and communicators. She has written patient education literature, developed online video compliance training modules, and helped create and implement personalized communication training plans for science and technology professionals. In addition to her work in the pharmaceutical industry, over the past 15 years, Barnard has coached hundreds of health care professionals on presentation skills for FDA hearings, CFO reports, and scientific speaker programs, as well as national and international congresses. Some of her clients include AstraZeneca, Bayer Corporation, WL Gore, and Boehringer Ingelheim.

Barnard, a native of Washington, North Carolina, studied communication at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has been involved in a variety of volunteer activities over the years, and she has just recently accepted an invitation to be a director for the Wilson Community College Foundation. She currently lives in Wilson.

Image of Deborah St James Deborah St James is a Partner in Listen Write Present LLC with offices in Wilson and Raleigh, NC. She was formerly Director of Scientific Communications and Publication Planning at Grifols and Manager of Editorial Services at Bayer Corporation, Pharmaceutical Division in West Haven, Connecticut. During that time, she developed and directed the Writing and Speaking for Excellence seminars – seminars designed for physicians, pharmacists, and other health care professionals. She is a former Editor of Better Health magazine and has taught English, technical, business, and medical writing at both the graduate and postgraduate levels. She is the author of Writing and Speaking for Excellence: A Guide for Physicians and editor of Writing, Speaking, and Communication Skills for Health Professionals. She is co-editor of Empathy and the Practice of Medicine and Doctors Afield.

See our Facebook album for photos taken at the event.

  Clip art image of a pocket watch May 1-7, 2013: Study ‘Round the Clock Returned for Spring Final Exams:

Once again, Hackney Library's wildly popular "Study 'Round the Clock" returned during final exams in May. As before, for much of this exam period, the library remained open 24/7.

The library was open the following hours during Reading Day and Exams:

  • Wednesday, May 1 (Reading Day) through Friday, May 3: Open 8 am Wednesday until 8 pm Friday

  • Saturday, May 4: 10 am - 7 pm

  • Sunday, May 5 through Tuesday, May 7: Open 2 pm Sunday and remain open continuously until closing at 6 pm Tuesday

  • Wednesday, May 8 through Friday, May 10: Open 8 am – 5 pm

"Study 'Round the Clock" provided an additional 37 hours that the library was open during exam period compared to the regular semester. Free coffee, tea, and hot chocolate were available during exam period for Barton faculty, staff, and students.

During these 24/7 periods, library services were available from 8 am until midnight only. From midnight until 8 am the following morning, no library services were available, but a police officer was on hand providing security during that time. (Access was limited to Barton students only during the midnight to 8 am time slots. Barton ID was required for admission from midnight until 8 am).

Study 'Round the Clock was sponsored by Hackney Library, the Friends of Hackney Library, the Barton College Office of Student Affairs, and the Barton Student Government Association.

  Friends' Sponsored Activities--2012

February 16, 2012: Book Signing: Writer and Comedic Performer Jane Borden:

On Thursday, February 16, 2012, the Friends of Hackney Library sponsored a book signing with author, editor, and comedic performer Jane Borden. The book signing took place from 5:30 – 7:00 pm in Hackney Library. More than 50 people attended the event.

(If you weren't able to join us, view a video filmed of her presentation at the event, or view photos from our Facebook photo album.)

Borden signed copies of her first book, I Totally Meant to Do That, a memoir in essays; copies were available for purchase during the book signing. Refreshments were provided at the event, which was free and open to the public.

A Greensboro, North Carolina native and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill alumna, Jane Borden is a writer and comedian who made the move from North Carolina to New York City in 1999. Her memoir, which among other things features her experiences as a Southern transplant to New York, has been hailed by Garden and Gun as “a must-read for displaced Southerners everywhere.” Vanity Fair called the book “affectionate” and New York Magazine deemed it “lowbrow-brilliant.” The Brooklyn Paper dubbed Borden “the new ‘It’ girl.” In the book, Borden contrasts her Southern debutante upbringing with her acquired Brooklyn-hipster persona.

Her humorous writing has also appeared in The New York Times Magazine and Modern Bride, in two anthologies, and on Saturday Night Live. As a comedian, she’s appeared on Comedy Central and VH1, and she performs regularly at storytelling and stand up shows, and in festivals.

Borden was a staff editor at Time Out New York for seven years, predominantly covering comedy and theater, and health and wellness. She appeared regularly on local morning news programs (NBC, Fox, CW) as a guest expert. In addition, she has interviewed a variety of celebrities, including Ricky Gervais, Christopher Guest, and Garrison Keillor, among many others. She now resides with her husband in Sewanee, TN.

March 13, 2012: Spring 2012 Dinner / Lecture Program, Featuring Author Joe Lansdale:

Image of author Joe Lansdale signing books at Hackney Library's Friends event March 13, 2012.

The Friends of Hackney Library hosted Joe Lansdale, prolific and versatile award-winning author and self-proclaimed "Champion Mojo Storyteller," on Tuesday, March 13, 2012, at its annual spring dinner and lecture in Barton College's Hardy Alumni Hall. A book signing and wine reception began at 6:00, followed by the program at 7:00 pm.

Lansdale has written over-the-top yarns of all sorts (horror, suspense, humor, science fiction, Western, mystery) and in many formats (novels, graphic novels, comic books, short stories, chapbooks, screenplays). His most acclaimed novel, The Bottoms (a coming of age tale that has been compared by many to Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird), has garnered both an Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America and a New York Times Notable Book Award.

Devil Red is Lansdale's eighth novel in his Hap Collins and Leonard Pine series of mysteries. His latest adult crime novel, Edge of Dark Water, was released on March 25, 2012; however, Friends' dinner attendees got a sneak preview as copies of this book were available for purchase at the event before its official release date. Lansdale has ventured into writing for youth as well; his young adult novel, All the Earth, Thrown to the Sky, was released in September 2011 to early acclaim.

Lansdale has written also for television, including four episodes of Batman: The Animated Series and others. He has written movie screenplays as well, and several of his works have also been adapted for feature films, including Bubba Ho-Tep, Don Coscarelli's 2002 adaptation of Lansdale's Bram Stoker award-winning short story of the same name. His latest movie, Christmas with the Dead (with a screenplay by son Keith Lansdale and starring daughter Kasey Lansdale, among others), was filmed in June 2011 and is now in production.

Born in Gladewater, Texas, and a lifelong resident of the state, Joe Richard Lansdale is a product of East Texas, which figures prominently in his work. As Darrell Schweitzer says in St. James Guide to Horror, Ghost, and Gothic Writers, Lansdale's work reflects "an authentic regional voice, which captures the ways and mores (and seamy underside) of rural Texas life as no outsider ever could." Likewise, a Publisher's Weekly review of Lansdale's The Bottoms says he is "best when recreating the East Texas dialogue and setting," while a Kirkus review of the same book refers to Lansdale as one "whose claim on East Texas…remains undisputed…."

Before becoming a writer full time in 1981, Lansdale held a variety of jobs, from transportation manager to bodyguard, from factory worker to goat farmer, and more. He is also an accomplished martial arts expert with over 30 years' experience: He is a two-time inductee into the International Martial Arts Hall of fame as well as a teacher in his own martial-arts studio.

Like his varied occupations, his writing is difficult to categorize, in part because a single work may combine several genres at once, and because many often contain both violence and a macabre, yet satirical, humor. In addition to Edgar Rice Burroughs, authors that Lansdale has identified as influential on his own work include Ray Bradbury, Robert Bloch, Flannery O'Connor, Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Chandler and Richard Matheson. But as an entry in Contemporary Authors: New Revision Series on Lansdale asserts, "Lansdale departs from these literary icons on at least two counts, each of which reflects one of his stated nonliterary influences: B-movies and comic books. No matter the genre in which he is writing, graphic horror and violence are usually present. No matter how dark the vision he is rendering, satirical and humorous elements often abound."

In addition to those already mentioned, Lansdale's work has received numerous awards, including eight Bram Stoker Awards, the Grand Master Award from the World Horror Convention, the Horror Critics Award, the Grinzane Cavour Prize for Literature, the "Shot in the Dark" International Crime Writer's Award, the Booklist Editor's Award, and the Critic's Choice Award, among others.

Lansdale is currently writer-in-residence in the English department at Stephen F. Austin State University in Nacogdoches, where he lives with his writer-editor wife, Karen.

If you missed the event, you can capture a glimpse of what he had to offer by listening to an informative and entertaining interview with Joe Lansdale, conducted prior to the event on February 9, 2012 by Steven Stewart, Hackney Library Technical Associate for Outreach and Public Services. Or view our Facebook photo album for images from the event.

August 21, 2012: Open House: Celebrating "The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" Day

Image of Open House 2012 FlyerAlong with some 200 attendees, Hackney Library celebrated “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks” Day during its Open House on Tuesday, August 21, from 4-7 pm. The event was sponsored by the Friends of Hackney Library.

The Open House continued the celebration of this special day following a book signing earlier in the day that featured David “Sonny” Lacks and his wife, Shirley Lacks. Sonny Lacks is the son of Henrietta Lacks, the subject of Skloot’s book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks. The book was chosen as Barton’s 2012 Freshmen Summer Reader.

This year's Open House highlighted themes from Immortal Life as well as showcased some of the recent changes made to the interior of the library building, such as tours of the newly constructed Office of Student Success (Tutoring and Career Services) housed in the library as well as tours of the library’s newly-reconfigured Research and Information Commons. The event also showcased art from Barton student Greg Oakley (recipient of the Milton Rogerson Photography Award) in the library’s new gallery area, as well as our New Books display of items added to the collection since Spring.

The event also featured some of the familiar components of previous open houses, including dessert served inside the library building, free Open House t-shirts (designed by Barton’s own art professor Susan Fecho and featuring the Henrietta Lacks HeLa Cell theme) given to all who filled out a survey plus other giveaways, five hardcover copies of Skloot's book given away as door prizes, and more.

The Open House was free and open to the Barton community as well as the general public. See our photo album on Facebook for images from the event.

September 18, 2012: Book Signing: Barton's Own Dr. Jeff Broadwater

Image of author Jeff Broadwater signing a copy of his latest book, 'James Madison' On Tuesday, September 18, 2012, the Friends of Hackney Library sponsored a book signing with Dr. Jeff Broadwater. Some fifty people attended the event, which took place from 5:30 – 7:00 pm in Hackney Library. Dr. Broadwater spoke for about thirty minutes about James Madison, highlighting anecdotes and other aspects of the book.

Broadwater, professor of history at Barton College, signed copies of his latest book, James Madison: A Son of Virginia and a Founder of the Nation (University of North Carolina Press, 2012). The book is a selection of the History Book Club, Military Book Club, and Book-of-the-Month Club.

Although occurring one day later, the book signing also commemorated Constitution Day (traditionally celebrated on the date of its signing, September 17) by highlighting Madison, a signatory and one of the most ardent supporters of the adoption of the United States Constitution. The event was also part of Hackney Library’s “Celebrating Academic Excellence” series.

Broadwater's James Madison has already received much acclaim: According to reviewer Frederick J. Augustyn, Jr. in Library Journal, "in an engagingly formulated work of synthesis, Broadwater offers a compelling view of the essential Madison by mindfully drawing upon the works of previous historians...without being derivative....Broadwater's clear writing style and contextual explanations make this work especially appealing to incipent scholars and general readers" (April 1, 2012, p. 86). Similarly, Kirkus Reviews states that in Broadwater's book, "an essential American philosopher and president gains a substantive treatment" (December 15, 2011, p. 2296).

Image of cover of Broadwater's latest book 'James Madison'From Broadwater’s perspective, no single figure can tell us more about the origins of the American republic than James Madison. In this biography, Broadwater focuses on Madison’s role in the battle for religious freedom in Virginia, his contributions to the adoption of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, his place in the evolution of the party system, his relationship with wife Dolley Madison, his performance as a wartime commander in chief, and his views on slavery.

A lawyer, historian, and scholar, Broadwater is the author of three previous books about leaders in American history and politics: Eisenhower and the Anti-Communist Crusade (1992); Adlai Stevenson and American Politics (1994); and George Mason, Forgotten Founder (2006), which received the Richard Slattern Award for biography from the Virginia Historical Society and was listed among the Washington Post’s Best Non-Fiction Books of 2006. Broadwater has also written a chapter titled “James Madison and the Dilemma of American Slavery” for A Companion to James Madison and James Monroe, which is to be published by Wiley Blackwell.

View our Facebook photo album for photos taken at the event.

October 9, 2012: Fall 2012 Dinner / Lecture Program, Featuring Author/Judge, Martin Clark

Image of novelist Martin Clark

Called “the thinking man’s John Grisham but, maybe better, the drinking man’s John Grisham” by the New York Times Magazine, the Friends of Hackney Library Fall 2012 Dinner/Lecture speaker, Martin Clark, is the author of three acclaimed novels as well as a sitting circuit court judge for the Virginia counties of Patrick and Henry and the city of Martinsville, Virginia.

Clark addressed the gathering as the featured speaker on Tuesday, October 9, 2012 in Hardy Alumni Hall. A book signing and wine reception began at 6:00 pm, followed by dinner and the program at 7:00 pm. At the book signing, Clark generously donated a copy of one of his books to each family unit in attendance, and during the after-dinner program, he regaled the audience with tales of "Liquor in the Mailbox" (his clandestine attempt to persuade a famous author to read the manuscript of his first novel) and the lengthy, difficult process he endured before first being published (which he illustrated by waving several rejection letters he received early on and still carries with him). An informative and humorous evening was enjoyed by all in attendance.

A cum laude Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Davidson College and a 1984 graduate of the University of Virginia School of Law, lawyer-turned-judge Clark endured eighteen years of rejection letters until the publication of his first novel, The Many Aspects of Mobile Home Living, which he began writing as a Davidson undergraduate. When published in 2000, Many Aspects became a New York Times Notable Book for that year, as well as a Book-of-the-Month Club selection, a finalist for the Stephen Crane First Fiction Award; it also appeared on several best-seller lists. The screenplay for Many Aspects is being written by Pulitzer Prize finalist Jerry Mitchell and his writing partner Mike Roden.

Martin’s second novel, Plain Heathen Mischief (2004), received starred reviews from Publishers Weekly and Kirkus Reviews, was chosen as a selection of the Quality Paperback Book Club and, prior to release, appeared on both Amazon’s and Barnes and Noble’s Top 100. Mischief was also nominated for several 2004 literary awards.

Cover image of author Martin Clark's third novel, 'The Legal Limit.'

In 2008, The Legal Limit followed as Martin’s third highly-acclaimed title. Based on a real case tried in his court in Stuart, Virginia, Legal Limit was selected by NPR as one of its “Summer Reads” and was featured and excerpted in the July 2008 edition of Reader’s Digest. It also received the 2009 Library of Virginia People’s Choice Award for Fiction and was designated both a Washington Post Book World and Bookmarks Magazine Book of the Year.

Reviewers have called The Legal Limit “the new standard by which other works of legal fiction should be judged” and “the best courtroom story ever.” The New York Times Book Review called it “a novel of ample graces.” The Washington Post dubbed it “[C]ompelling … Clark has struck a fine balance between down-home ambiance and high-octane plot. Skillfully weaving a plot that includes lie detectors, wiretaps and arcane legal principles, the author creates a world in which family ties can easily turn into nooses.” Rights to the novel have been sold to Bela Bajara at CBS/Paramount for development as a miniseries.

According to a July 16, 2008 interview in the Jackson, Mississippi Clarion-Ledger and re-posted on his web site, Clark describes his writing style in this way: “I like to write books that have trap doors, high banks, a lot of velocity, twists and turns, bit plots….I like books that have a beginning, middle and end, and maybe a little payoff as you go, then a big payoff at the end,” he explains. “So much of what you read today, especially short stories, is a writer taking 15 pages describing the stepping stones going up to his aunt’s house. The story just stops dead.” As the many positive reviews of his work attest, Clark has successfully avoided committing that literary crime in his own fiction.

Martin Clark lives in Stuart, Virginia, with his wife Deana. He is currently at work on his fourth novel.

To see pictures taken at the event, see our Facebook photo album chronicling the festivities.

November 1, 2012: Book Signing: Journalist and Author Tim Madigan

Image of author Tim Madigan On Thursday, November 1, 2012, Barton College's Friends of Hackney Library were delighted to host Tim Madigan, journalist and author, for a book signing. Held in Hackney Library from 5:30 pm to 7:00 pm, the event promoted the recent release of the second edition of Madigan's 2006 book, I'm Proud of You: My Friendship with Fred Rogers. This latest edition, copies of which were available for purchase at the event, features a new afterword by the author and is in paperback format.

At the book signing, Madigan spoke about his remarkable friendship with the beloved Mister Rogers, sharing with attendees what it was like to be "good friends with one of history's greatest humans." Madigan also spoke about his personal friendship with Dr. and Mrs. Norval Kneten, Barton College's president and his wife, crediting them with helping him through the same dark period as well. The book signing, which included the always-stellar refreshments of Aramark's Tony Tilley and Lynn Bigness, was free and open to the public.

Madigan, currently of Arlington, Texas but reared in a small town in Minnesota, is an award-winning journalist and author of two other critically acclaimed books, See No Evil: Blind Devotion and Bloodshed in David Koresh's Holy War (1993) and The Burning: Massacre, Destruction and the Tulsa Race Riot of 1921 (2001). The latest edition of I'm Proud of You was released in March 2012 and tells the story of Madigan's friendship with Fred Rogers, known best to many as the lovable, good-natured gentleman who welcomed generations of children to Mister Rogers Neighborhood.

Reflective of the close bond between the two men, Fred Rogers served as one of the first readers of Madigan's recently completed first novel, Every Common Sight, which is slated for publication next year.

Image of Madigan's book 'I'm Proud of You', 2nd edition "Everyone knows Fred Rogers was a good man," said Tom Junod of Esquire Magazine. "What Tim Madigan was blessed to discover was that he was also a great one, and, like all great men, challenged as much as he inspired. Fred inspired because he saw the good in everyone; Fred challenged because he wanted everyone to see the good in themselves. Now Fred comes to life in I'm Proud of You, with his simple goodness etched on every page, and his complicated greatness etched in the heart of every reader who finishes the book and decides to become a better person."

Madigan and Rogers first met in 1995 when Madigan was assigned to write a profile of children's television icon Fred Rogers for the Fort-Worth Star-Telegram. One November morning, he met Fred at the WQED station in Pittsburgh. Fred greeted him with a smile and said a heartfelt, "Welcome to our Neighborhood." Madigan, watching from the sidelines, saw an episode of "Mister Rogers Neighborhood" unfold, and then later had a chance to sit down and talk with Fred. They spoke about family, friends, childhoods, religion, and heroes - a talk that was unlike any profile interview Madigan had ever had.

A few days later after following Rogers around and quizzing him regularly, something happened that was unthinkable to Madigan at the time - Rogers called him at his hotel room, "Tim, this is Fred Rogers. If you don't have other plans, I was wondering whether you'd like to join my family and me for church tomorrow." Of all the people who had profiled Rogers, Madigan was the first he ever invited to church.

Image of author Tim Madigan signing a guest's book, 'I'm Proud of You', 2nd edition (Photo credit:  Keith Tew) After suffering marital problems and struggling with depression, Madigan found an advisor in Rogers who imparted a gentle but powerful perspective on spirituality, marriage, depression, and the nature of true friendship. With his friend's loving and patient guidance, Madigan eventually came to understand that his emotional troubles were rooted in a deep fear that his father had never truly been proud of him. Hence the mantra of the friendship between the two, the phrase Rogers used to conclude dozens of letters and email messages to Madigan: I'm Proud of You. Their life-altering friendship lasted until Rogers's death in 2003.

When not writing books or newspaper stories, Tim enjoys spending time with his wife, Catherine, being a dad, playing the guitar, coaching and playing ice hockey, and backpacking in the Canadian Rockies.

And, of course, signing copies of the second edition of I'm Proud of You, which the Boston Sunday Globe has called "a loving testament to the power of friendship and to a most remarkable man."

See our Facebook Album 1 and Album 2 for other pictures from the event.

December 4, 2012: Book Signing: Children's Author and Illustrator Bonnie Christensen

Image of author/illustrator Bonnie Christensen On Tuesday, December 4, 2012, the Friends of Hackney Library organization sponsored a book signing with children's author and illustrator Bonnie Christensen. The book signing took place from 4:00 - 6:00 pm in Hackney Library. Some sixty people were in attendance to hear Bonnie explain her process of writing and illustrating, and she displayed samples of work on past and current books, to the delight of the children and adults in attendance.

This was Bonnie Christensen's second book signing at Hackney Library; the Friends first hosted a book signing in December 2009 following the release of her award-winning book Django.

Cover image of Christensen's 'Fabulous: A Portrait of Andy Warhol' (2011)Since that time, Christensen has published four more children's books: Fabulous!: A Portrait of Andy Warhol (2011, which received starred reviews from Booklist and School Library Journal); The Princess of Borscht (2011; written by Leda Schubert and illustrated by Christensen, it received a starred review from Kirkus Reviews); Plant a Little Seed (April 2012; Booklist calls the book "a quiet yet engaging presentation that is sure to inspire gardening attempts by young readers"); and her latest, I, Galileo (released June 12, 2012; critics are already calling its illustrations "exquisite," "vivid," and "vibrant," with first person narrative that "flows beautifully" and "renders the text both engaging and accessible").

Cover image of Christensen-illustrated 'The Princess of Borscht' (2011)Christensen is a native of Saranac Lake, NY. She began her career working in New York theater after earning a B.A. degree in Theatre and Communication from the University of Vermont. Her theater work included Joe Papp's Public Theatre, New York Shakespeare Festival, and others. Christensen eventually focused primarily on playwriting, and some of her plays were produced off-off-Broadway. During this time, she also worked for Screen Actors Guild and Paramount Pictures.

After studying wood engraving and attending classes at Parsons School of Design and Center for Book Arts, Christensen returned to Vermont to focus on wood engraving and was offered her first illustration work. She explains her eventual emergence as a book author and illustrator: "Through a keen interest in printmaking and letterpress printing I eventually hand-printed and bound a limited-edition book. Desire to see that book reach a wider audience eventually led me to trade publishers and initiated my career," she says in Something About the Author (vol. 110, p. 41).

Cover image of Christensen's 'Plant a Little Seed' (2012) She authored and illustrated her first book for children in 1994, an ABC book called An Edible Alphabet, which received critical acclaim for its design and illustrations. In addition to those mentioned above, other books she has both written and illustrated include Rebus Riot (1997), Woody Guthrie: Poet of the People (2001), In My Grandmother's House (2003), and The Daring Nellie Bly (2003). Christensen has also illustrated others' works, including award winners such as Stephen Krensky's Breaking Into Print (1996), Craig Crist Evan's Moon Over Tennessee (1999), Mary Pope Osborne's Pompeii, Lost and Found (2006), as well as the acclaimed The Princess of Borscht, mentioned above. Current projects include a book about Elvis Presley, among others.

Cover image of Christensen's 'I, Galileo' (2012) In addition to her books, she has contributed to periodicals such as Vermont Life, National Gardening, and Ladybug and served as adjunct professor of Fine Arts at St. Michaels' College in Burlington, VT. Bonnie currently resides in Wilson, North Carolina.

For more information about Bonnie Christensen and her work, please visit her web site. To see pictures from the event, visit our album on Facebook.

  Clip art image of a pocket watch December 6-12, 2012: Study ‘Round the Clock Returned for Spring Final Exams:

Once again, Hackney Library's wildly popular "Study 'Round the Clock" returned during final exams in December. As before, for much of this exam period, the library remained open 24/7.

The library was open the following hours during Reading Day and Exams:

  • Thursday, December 6 (Reading Day) through Friday, December 7: Open 8 am Thursday until 8 pm Friday

  • Saturday, December 8: 10 am - 7 pm

  • Sunday, December 9 through Wednesday, December 12: Open 2 pm Sunday and remain open continuously until closing at 6 pm Wednesday

  • Thursday, December 13 through Friday, December 14: Open 8 am – 5 pm

"Study 'Round the Clock" provided an additional 37 hours that the library was open during exam period compared to the regular semester. Free coffee, tea, and hot chocolate were available during exam period for Barton faculty, staff, and students.

During these 24/7 periods, library services were available from 8 am until midnight only. From midnight until 8 am the following morning, no library services were available, but a police officer was on hand providing security during that time. (Access was limited to Barton students only during the midnight to 8 am time slots. Barton ID was required for admission from midnight until 8 am).

Study 'Round the Clock was sponsored by Hackney Library, the Friends of Hackney Library, the Barton College Office of Student Affairs, and the Barton Student Government Association.


  Friends' Sponsored Activities--2011

  April 5, 2011: Spring 2011 Dinner / Lecture Program:

Image of poet, writer, and psychologist Judson Mitcham The Spring 2011 Dinner/Lecture featured award-winning poet, writer, and psychologist Judson Mitcham.

The Friends program was held on Tuesday, April 5, 2011, beginning with a book signing and wine reception at 6:00 pm, followed by dinner and a lecture at 7:00 pm., in Barton College's Hardy Alumni Hall.

A Georgia native, Mitcham was not formally trained as a writer but rather as a psychologist, earning his undergraduate and doctoral degrees in psychology from the University of Georgia. He taught psychology at the Fort Valley State University in Georgia from 1974 until his retirement as associate professor in 2004. Yet his poignant, powerful award-winning poetry and novels have led to adjunct professor positions in creative writing at the University of Georgia as well as at Emory University, where he has directed the Summer Writers' Institute.

He has held fellowships from the national Endowment for the Arts, the Bread Loaf Writers' Conference, and the Georgia Council for the Arts. He currently teaches creative writing at Mercer University and in the MFA program at Georgia College and State University.

Mitcham's poetry has been published in a variety of literary journals, including Harper's, Georgia Review, Chattahoochee Review, Gettysburg Review, Poetry, Southern Poetry Review, and Southern Review. For his first poetry collection, Somewhere in Ecclesiastes (1991), Mitcham received the Devins Award and was named Georgia Author of the Year. Writing in Library Journal, Barbara Hoffer says of the collection, "Mitcham writes ruminative poems that gather power slowly like an oncoming storm, then stab you through the heart with a particularly telling image....There are no histrionics here, no effort to shock or amuse or seduce; just beautifully realized poetry that uses language as it should be used" (Dec. 1991, p. 150).

He then turned to fiction with his debut novel, The Sweet Everlasting (1996), which was awarded the Townsend Prize for Fiction (Georgia's oldest and most prestigious literary award) and also garnered Mitcham his second Georgia Author of the Year award. The Sweet Everlasting has been compared to the work of William Kennedy and Cormac McCarthy. Mitcham then returned to poetry with his published collection, This April Day (2003).

His second novel, Sabbath Creek (2004), also won the Townsend Prize, earning Mitcham distinction as the only writer thus far to twice receive the award. Patrick Sullivan in Library Journal describes the work as "Mitcham's masterfully drawn, emotionally rich gem of a second novel....[It is] a powerfully realized, deeply satisfying novel" (March 15, 2004, p. 108).

In 2007, Mitcham published his latest poetry collection, A Little Salvation: Poems Old and New, which is composed of forty new works as well as previously published poems.

In The New Georgia Encyclopedia Online entry for Judson Mitcham, Hugh Ruppersburg sums up Mitcham's work: "In both his novels and his poetry, Mitcham's elegiac voice looks backwards with fondness and discernment on a personal and regional past slipping rapidly beyond reach."

Mitcham resides with his wife, Jean, in Macon, Georgia.

  Clip art image of a pocket watch May 12-18, 2011: Study ‘Round the Clock Returned for Spring Final Exams:

Once again, Hackney Library's wildly popular "Study 'Round the Clock" returned during final exams in May. As before, for much of this exam period, the library remained open 24/7.

The library was open the following hours during Reading Day and Exams:

  • Thursday, May 12 (Reading Day) and Friday, May 13: Open 8 am Thursday until 8 pm Friday

  • Saturday, May 14: 10 am - 5 pm

  • Sunday, May 15 through Wednesday, May 18: Open 2 pm Sunday and remain open continuously until closing at 6 pm Wednesday

  • Thursday, May 19: Open 1 pm – 5 pm (Library was closed from 8 am to 1 pm due to a conference in the morning.)

  • Friday, May 20: 8 am - 5 pm

"Study 'Round the Clock" provided an additional 38 hours that the library was open during exam period compared to the regular semester.

During these 24/7 periods, library services were available from 8 am until midnight only. From midnight until 8 am the following morning, no library services were available, but a police officer was on hand providing security during that time. (Access was limited to Barton students only during the midnight to 8 am time slots. Barton ID was required for admission from midnight until 8 am).

The event was sponsored by Hackney Library and the Friends of Hackney Library, the Barton College Office of Student Affairs, and the Barton Student Government Association.

  May 18, 2011: Book Signing: Featuring Author Steve Berry's National Book Tour Kick-Off at Hackney Library:

Image of author Steve Berry

Barton College’s Hackney Library is delighted to have been selected as the first stop on bestselling author Steve Berry’s national book tour to promote The Jefferson Key (Ballantine Books, May 2011), the latest novel in his series of thrillers featuring protagonist Cotton Malone.

Berry kicked off his tour in the company of some 70 guests on Wednesday, May 18, from 5:30 to 7 pm, with a book signing and reception on the first floor of Hackney Library. The event, sponsored by the Friends of Hackney Library, was free and open to the public. Copies of The Jefferson Key were available for purchase during the event.

In addition to signing books during his appearance, Berry also spoke about the history of North Carolina and how it applies to his latest work (the Old North State serves as one of several backdrops in The Jefferson Key), his passionate support of historic preservation, and his work as an author.

Steve Berry was raised in Georgia and graduated from the Walter F. George School of Law at Mercer University. His success as a novelist was slow in coming; it took 12 years, 85 rejections and over five different manuscripts before he was able to sell a story. Now he is a fixture on the New York Times bestseller lists, with over 12 million books in print and translations into 40 languages in 51 countries.

His previous novels in the Cotton Malone series include The Emperor’s Tomb, The Paris Vendetta, The Charlemagne Pursuit, The Venetian Betrayal, The Alexandra Link, and The Templar Legacy. He has also written three stand-alone thrillers (The Third Secret, The Romanov Prophecy, and The Amber Room), and two e-book original short stories (The Balkan Escape and The Devil’s Gold). Berry is extremely active in the writing community (as an accomplished instructor, he has taught writing to audiences across the globe) and is a former president and founding member of International Thriller Writers.

Berry’s fiction has garnered him a number of awards: In June 2005, he was selected by the Georgia Writer’s Association as its Author of the Year. Then, in October 2005, the Amelia Book Island Festival bestowed on him its first Stellar Award. The Charlemagne Pursuit was selected as one of the five Best Thrillers for 2008 by Library Journal. In 2010 the Amelia Island Book Festival made him its first Literary Leader. And in March, 2011, Berry received the Royden B. Davis Distinguished Author Award from the University of Scranton.

A devoted student of history, Berry is dedicated to researching his novels. In 2010, he and his wife, Elizabeth, founded History Matters—a nonprofit organization dedicated to aiding the preservation of the fragile reminders of our past. Since then, they have traveled the world raising much-needed funds for a wide range of historic preservation projects. Appropriately enough for history aficionados, Berry and his wife reside in the historic city of St. Augustine, Florida.

As in his previous works, Berry’s devotion to history also comes through in his latest novel. The Jefferson Key begins with the attempted assassination of President Andrew Jackson and then follows a slalom course of thrills as he deftly combines suspense with solid historical fact. Former Justice Department operative, now Copenhagen bookseller, Cotton Malone returns to the United States for his first domestic adventure. Along the way he battles an obscure clause in the Constitution, Thomas Jefferson’s secret cipher, an old enemy out for revenge, and a cadre of modern day pirates firmly rooted in their buccaneer ways. In addition to North Carolina, other locales, including Virginia, Washington D.C., New York City and Nova Scotia, figure in the setting of the novel.

Berry reported at the event that he is giving Cotton Malone a year off while he writes a stand-alone novel featuring a different set of characters. Malone will return in another novel following completion of the stand-alone.

  August 25, 2011: Fall 2011 Open House Band Book Tour:

This fall, The Band Book Tour presented a major concert event. On Thursday, August 25th, 2011, The Hackney All-Stars rocked the Barton College Library. Dozens of musicians from across the state participated in a jam session that blew the roof right off the library. The event began at 4:00pm and featured food, giveaways, and more music than anyone knew what to do with. The event was sponsored in part by the Friends of Hackney Library.

View the following commercial made to advertise the event beforehand:

  September 18, 2011: Friends of Visual Arts and Friends of Hackney Library Co-Sponsor Art Lecture, “Marginalia, Mischief, and the Ornamented Book”:

Barton College’s Friends of Visual Arts and Friends of Hackney Library jointly sponsored a lecture, “Marginalia, Mischief, and the Ornamented Book,” and reception on Sunday, September 18, at 4 pm in the Willis N. Hackney Library. The event also included the ll Libro: The Art of the Book exhibition at 3:30 pm in the Barton Art Galleries.

The featured speaker was Lisa Beth Robinson, the proprietor of Somnambulist Tango Press (where she makes artists’ books –letterpress, papermaking, printmaking). Ms. Robinson is also an instructor at East Carolina University.

Robinson exhibited her books “Migration” and “Nomad: Orientation” in the “Il Libro: The Art of the Book” exhibition on view in the Barton Art Galleries. Robinson described her books as a visualization of the relationship between language and experience, making connections between disassociated objects and concerns.

She shared her insights regarding the ornamented book, examples of which are in the fore-edge collection of books donated to Hackney Library by the William Leibee Wheeler Estate. Fore-edge books have scenes painted on the closed books’ page edges. (The Wheeler collection of ornamented books is on permanent display in a lighted case just outside the Library Classroom.)

Robinson holds degrees from the Johnston Center at the University of Redlands (Bachelor of Arts) and University of Wisconsin-Madison (Master of Library and Information Science and Master of Fine Arts). Robinson’s teaching experience includes the Arrowmont School of Crafts, the Penland School of Crafts, and the Pocosin Arts Folk School.

Her work is in the permanent collections of numerous national institutions, including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art in California and the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York.

The lecture was free and open to the public.

  October 25, 2011: Fall 2011 Dinner / Lecture Program:

Image of author Tim Dorsey

The wacky world of deadly yet endearing psychotic serial killers, frenetic Florida road trips, and various and sundry oddball characters recently came to Wilson. Novelist Tim Dorsey spoke at the Friends of Hackney Library's Fall 2011 dinner on October 25, 2011 in Hardy Alumni Hall on the Barton College Campus. The event began with a book signing at 6:00 pm followed by dinner and the program at 7:00 pm.

A former journalist with fourteen novels featuring manic serial killer Serge Storms under his belt (and one more on the way), Dorsey writes in the vein of Carl Hiaasen reminiscent of Elmore Leonard, but with his own distinctive voice. The series featuring Storms is composed of a set of hilarious yet violent farces taking place in various Florida locales. The Chicago Tribune has called Dorsey's characters “some of the most wacky villains and situations since Hiaasen stuck a plastic alligator down a stranger's throat and called it Tourist Season.” The Dallas Morning News has called his work “wildly funny, maniacally disrespectful and genuinely out of control.” The New York Times characterizes Dorsey's novels as “vulgar, violent and gaudier than sunsets on the Keys….” And referring to fans’ anticipation of Dorsey's next work, the Miami Herald says simply, “There ought to be a law: If it's summer, we get a new Tim Dorsey novel.” (And this year, we'll even get a Christmas novel as well--read on.)

Image of author Tim Dorsey exploring the wackiness of Serge Country.

Dorsey was born in Indiana but moved to Florida at age one, growing up in the small town of Riviera Beach, about an hour north of Miami. He got his journalistic start at Auburn University, where he was editor of the student newspaper, The Plainsman. For four years after graduation, he was a police and courts reporter for the Alabama Journal, the now-defunct evening newspaper in Montgomery, Alabama. He then moved to the Tampa Tribune, where he held a variety of positions, including general assignment reporter, copy desk editor, political reporter (in the paper's Tallahassee bureau), night metro editor and night news coordinator.

He left the paper in August 1999 to write full time and has since had thirteen novels published in several languages: Florida Roadkill, Hammerhead Ranch Motel, Orange Crush, Triggerfish Twist, The Stingray Shuffle, Cadillac Beach, Torpedo Juice, The Big Bamboo, Hurricane Punch, Atomic Lobster, Nuclear Jellyfish, Gator A-Go-Go, and Electric Barracuda, which was released in February 2011.

His most recent work is a Christmas novel about Serge–-When Elves Attack: A Joyous Christmas Greeting from the Criminal Nutbars of the Sunshine State–-released on October 25, 2011, the date of our Fall Dinner. Next to follow in the Serge lineup is Pineapple Grenade, which is due in January 2012.

The author lives in Tampa, Florida with his family.

Enjoy this interview we conducted with the author in advance of this event:

  Clip art image of a pocket watch December 8-14, 2011: "Study 'Round the Clock" -- Library Open 24/7 During Exams

Once again, Hackney Library's wildly popular "Study 'Round the Clock" returned during final exams in December. As before, for much of this exam period, the library remained open 24/7.

The library was open the following hours during Reading Day and Exams:

  • Thursday, December 8 (Reading Day) and Friday, December 9: From 8 am Thursday until 6 pm Friday

  • Saturday, December 10: 10 am - 5 pm

  • Sunday, December 11-Wednesday, December 14: Open 2 pm Sunday and remain open continuously until closing at 6 pm Wednesday

  • Thursday, December 15 and Friday, December 16: 8 am - 5 pm

"Study 'Round the Clock" provided an additional 38 hours that the library was open during exam period compared to the regular semester.

During these 24/7 periods, library services were available from 8 am until midnight only. From midnight until 8 am the following morning, no library services were available, but a police officer was on hand providing security during that time. (Access was limited to Barton students only during the midnight to 8 am time slots. Barton ID was required for admission from midnight until 8 am).

The event was sponsored by Hackney Library and the Friends of Hackney Library, the Barton College Office of Student Affairs, and the Barton Student Government Association.


  Friends' Sponsored Activities--2010

  April 13, 2010: Spring 2010 Dinner / Lecture Program:

Image of historian William E. Leuchtenburg The Spring 2010 Dinner/Lecture featured noted modern American history scholar Dr. William E. Leuchtenburg, the William Rand Kenan Jr. Professor Emeritus of History at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

The Friends program was held on Tuesday, April 13, 2010, beginning with a book signing and wine reception at 6:00 pm, followed by dinner and a lecture at 7:00 pm., in Barton College's Hardy Alumni Hall.

Dr. Leuchtenburg is one of the nation's top experts on the U.S. presidency in general, and the leading national scholar on Franklin Delano Roosevelt in particular. A native of Queens, New York, Dr. Leuchtenburg received his bachelor's degree from Cornell University, and his master's and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia University. After brief teaching stints at both Smith College and Harvard University, he began his 30-year tenure on the faculty at Columbia University, where he became De Witt Clinton Professor of American History. In 2008, he received an honorary doctor of letters degree from Columbia. He also served as Harmsworth Professor at Oxford University.

Lured to the UNC-Chapel Hill campus from Columbia in 1982, Dr. Leuchtenburg served for 20 years at UNC until his retirement in 2002. He has also served as president of three major historical organizations: the American Historical Association, the Organization of American Historians, and the Society of American Historians.

Dr. Leuchtenburg is the author of more than a dozen books on twentieth-century American History, including Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal, 1932-1940 and The White House Looks South: Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman, Lyndon B. Johnson. Although the majority of his books concern FDR and the New Deal, he was asked by his longtime friend, the late Arthur Schlesinger Jr., to write his latest book, Herbert Hoover, as part of the American Presidents Series of biographies on all the presidents. The book was released in January 2009.

He and his wife, Jean Anne, reside in Chapel Hill.

  April 13, 2010: Friends of Hackney Library Harlow Head Faculty Award--2010

Image of Library Director Rodney Lippard presenting the 2010 Harlow Head Friends of Hackney Library Faculty Award to art professor Susan Fecho.In 2007, the Friends of Hackney Library established the Friends of Hackney Library Harlow Head Faculty Award to honor Dr. Head, Professor of Geography and Chair of the Department of History and Social Sciences, upon his retirement. During his tenure, Dr. Head was an ardent supporter of and contributor to Hackney Library in both word and deed.

This award is presented annually to the faculty member who most exemplifies these attributes in his/her support of the library. The faculty member is nominated by the library staff and voted on by the Board of Directors for The Friends of Hackney Library. Previous faculty recipients are Dr. Kathy James (2008) and Dr. Jane Webster (2009).

Because of her support for the library and its mission, the library staff was delighted to nominate Ms. Susan Fecho, Professor of Art in Graphic Design and Chair of the Art Department, to be the recipient of the 2010 Friends of Hackney Library Harlow Head Faculty Award. Susan has contributed to the development of the collection of the Hackney Library with selections of materials, especially in the areas of Graphic Design. She engages students in using the library and she makes a point of attending events held in the library. Susan and her husband, Scott, have been members of the Friends of Hackney Library and are currently Signature Sustainers for all of the cultural arts organizations. In 2009, Susan, who is a children's book illustrator herself, moderated the panel of children's book illustrators for the Friends of Hackney Library Spring Event.

The Friends were thrilled to present the award to her at the Spring Dinner/Lecture on April 13. 2010. Susan received a certificate of recognition; her name has been engraved and placed on the plaque that hangs in the foyer of the library; and she received $100 to select materials to be placed in the library in her honor.

  Clip art image of a pocket watch May 13-18, 2010: "Study 'Round the Clock" -- Library Open 24/7 During Exams

Once again, Hackney Library's wildly popular "Study 'Round the Clock" returned during final exams in May. As before, for much of this exam period, the library again remained open 24/7.

The library was open the following hours during Reading Day/Exams:

  • Thursday, May 13 (Reading Day) and Friday, May 14: From 8 am Thursday until 8 pm Friday
  • Saturday, May 15: 10 am - 7 pm
  • Sunday, May 16-Wednesday, May 19: Open 2 pm Sunday and remained open continuously until closing at 6 pm Wednesday
  • Thursday, May 20 and Friday, May 21: 8 am - 5 pm

"Study 'Round the Clock" provided an additional 37 hours the library was open during exam period compared to the regular semester.

During these 24/7 periods, library services were available from 8 am until midnight only. From midnight until 8 am the following morning, no library services were available, but a police officer was on hand providing security during that time. (Access was limited to Barton students only during the midnight to 8 am time slots. Barton ID was required for admission from midnight until 8 am).

The event was sponsored by the Friends of Hackney Library, the Barton College Office of Student Affairs, and the Barton Student Government Association, and Hackney Library.

  June 27, 2010: Library Staff Attend ALA and Receive John Cotton Dana Award

Hackney Library was chosen as one of six recipients for the American Library Association's (ALA) prestigious John Cotton Dana Award for Library Public Relations, in recognition of the 2009 Open House "Band Books Tour." The "Band Books Tour" for which the award was given as well as the travel to the conference, lodging and meals were funded by the Friends of Hackney Library.

The award, which included a $5,000 cash prize for each recipient, was presented at the ALA's annual conference in Washington, DC this June at a special tea, which was held on Sunday, June 27 in the Grand Ballroom of the Willard Intercontinental Hotel. The award was presented by Harold Regan, President of the HW Wilson Company and William Stanton, President of the HW Wilson Foundation.

Receiving the award on behalf of the library were Rodney Lippard, Cynthia Collins and Steven Stewart; also in attendance was Mary Boone, State Librarian of North Carolina, who joined in the celebration with other library staff members Rich Fulling, Kathy Thompson, and Tempie Hayes. While in DC, the Hackney Library contingent was also able to take part in certain aspects of the Annual Conference. The travel to the conference, lodging and meals was provided by the Friends of Hackney Library.

  August/September 2010: New Library Café Area Now Available to Students

Image of newly-installed booths in the library's cafe area.The library faculty and staff have converted the southeast corner of the library's first floor (near the current magazines display) into a café area, complete with diner-style booths and café tables, as well as small portable dry-erase boards on wall hooks and markers to be used for collaborative study. The café area was repainted by library staff over the summer to distinguish it from the rest of the library.

Funding for the café area and its furnishings has been provided by the cash award that accompanied the American Library Association's prestigious John Cotton Dana Library Public Relations award, which Hackney Library received in June at the ALA annual conference in Washington, DC in recognition of its 2009 "Band Book Tour" Open House. The "Band Book Tour" was sponsored by the Friends of Hackney Library.

Image of newly-installed tables in the library's cafe area.  Flat-panel TVs will soon be installed on the wall adjacent to the tables.The impetus for converting this area is the success many academic libraries across the country have experienced in installing cafés; they have proven to be extremely popular among both students and faculty in institutions that have implemented them.

The café idea was also proposed by the consultants who conducted the Hackney Library space utilization study in 2005, which was funded by an LSTA grant. This partial renovation of the library provides a relaxing place for students to work collaboratively or to take a break from studying. The area has already proved extremely popular with our own students, who have already made extensive use of the booths in the short time they've been available.

  August 26, 2010: Hackney Library Open House: "The Band Book Tour" Featured Live Music

Logo for Hackney Library's 'The Band Book Tour 2010'Back by popular demand, the award-winning Band Book Tour returned to rock the Library! (See our commercial for Band Book Tour 2010.)

The Friends of Hackney Library organization presented its fifth annual Open House event on Thursday, August 26 from 4-8 pm, which for the second time featured live music with 'The Band Book Tour 2010.'

This year's lineup featured four terrific bands and a wide variety of styles of music, plus food, prizes, and giveaways from local businesses. Live sound was provided by Miller Music Center.

The following bands were featured during the event:

4:00 pm: Straight-Up! (R&B, soul, funk, Motown);
5:00 pm: TripleWide (blues, funk, rock);
6:00 pm: Elemental P (rock, funk, blues, jamband); and
7:00 pm: The Oatmeal Conspiracy (indie, pop, rock, acid jazz)

The bands began playing in rotation at 4:00 pm, and dinner was served outside the library by Aramark to Barton students on the meal plan. The bands performed inside the library, where dessert was served.

Like last year, the theme of this year's Open House riffed on the American Library Association's annual Banned Books Week campaign, sponsored each September to celebrate intellectual freedom and to decry various attempts through the years to ban certain books because of their content. In addition to the music, one of the activities during the Open House included a contest in which prizes were awarded to winners who guessed correctly the characters/locations of various attempted banned books. (Learn more about the Band Book Tour 2010 by viewing our "newscast" with anchor Brick Studley on the "Library News Network" [LNN].)

There were also giveaways, door prizes donated by several local businesses, and plenty of new, exciting things to see inside the Library. An online survey was administered during the Open House; those who completed the survey received T-shirts sporting the 2010 Band Book Tour logo. Also, there was a special giveaway of Band Book Tour 2010 backpacks for people who wore their Band Book Tour t-shirt from last year.

Many thanks to the following additional sponsors for making this special Open House possible:

Agave Grill
The Dog House Sports Grill
Luna Bean Coffee Shop
Miller Music Center
Professor O'Cools of Wilson, NC
Quince: "A Southern Bistro"
The Rib Hut
Subs Plus
Target
Wal-Mart

(For more information, see our flyer about the event.)

  September 2010: New Digital Technology Installed in Library Classroom

Image of new digital technology being demonstrated to faculty during one of the 'teas' held on September 23.Thanks to an LSTA* grant and matching funds from the Friends of Hackney Library organization, the library recently purchased for its classroom a variety of digital components to aid both instructors and students in using cutting-edge educational technology. Installation of various components began on September 2, and testing of and refinements to the equipment continued through mid-September.

The new classroom features an interactive Promethean ActivBoard with ceiling-mounted projector and an ActivSlate for mobile use throughout the classroom, as well as ActivExpress interactive voting technology (32 clickers). In addition, we have purchased an HP Touchsmart for the instructor's computer, complete with wireless keyboard and mouse. Soon to come will be video cameras for student and faculty/staff use within the classroom for creation of podcasts, and more. Twenty wireless Netbook computers have also been purchased (which, when not in use in the classroom, are being checked out for student use from the circulation desk).

Image of Library Director Rodney Lippard demonstrating the ActivBoard's interactive capabilities to Professor Murali Ranganathan.To support the additional wireless Netbooks and other technological components, two additional wireless access points were added to the two current access points already located in the library to boost the speed and capability of the library's overall wireless network. Many thanks to IT staff as well as Technology and Digital Services Librarian Jason Fleming for their work in configuring the various components and making them operable.

Image of faculty members trying out the new interactive clickers while playing a library trivia game during one of the faculty 'teas' held on September 23.The library held three faculty "teas" in the classroom on September 23 to demonstrate the new technology to a total of 16 interested faculty members. Faculty may on occasion want to make use of the classroom with their own students.

* Federal LSTA funds are made possible through grants from the Institute of Museum and Library Services and are administered by the State Library of North Carolina, a division of the North Carolina Department of Cultural Resources.

  October 5, 2010: Fall 2010 Dinner / Lecture Program:

Image of author and poet Robert Morgan signing his book 'Boone' at the Friends Fall 2010 Dinner Lecture The Fall 2010 Dinner/Lecture featured award-winning author and poet Robert Morgan, Kappa Alpha Professor of English at Cornell University.

The Friends program was held on Tuesday, October 5, 2010, beginning with a book signing and wine reception at 6:00 pm, followed by dinner and a lecture at 7:00 pm., in Barton College's Hardy Alumni Hall.

A native of Hendersonville, North Carolina, Morgan received a B.A. in English from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, an MFA from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and an Honorary Doctor of Letters from UNC-Chapel Hill.

As a teenager growing up on his family's farm in Blue Ridge Mountains' Green River valley, Morgan was interested in composing music as well as writing poetry and fiction. But as he explains on his web site, "I was encouraged to study science in those 'Beat the Russian" years after the first Sputnik was launched," and indeed, he embarked on studies in engineering and applied mathematics at NC State. After his first writing teacher at NC State encouraged him to write stories and poems of people and places he knew growing up, Morgan says "One day he brought one of my stories to class, an account of visiting a great-grandmother in an old house in the mountains, and announced he had wept when he read the story. This was better praise than I had gotten in math classes, and I was hooked on writing." Thus began what has become a prolific writing career.

Image of author and poet Robert Morgan signing books for guests at the Friends Fall 2010 Dinner LectureAlthough his earliest publications were short stories, his work covers a variety of genres. In the early 1960s, he became enthralled with poetry, publishing his first poetry collection, Zirconia Poems, in 1969. Three more books of poetry followed in the next ten years (Land Diving, 1976; Trunk & Thicket, 1978; and Groundwork, 1979). In 1980, he again began writing fiction, publishing his first book of short stories, The Blue Valleys (nominated for the First Fiction Award, American Academy of Arts and Letters), in 1989, followed by more poetry. After more stories, essays and interviews, Morgan turned to novels. His second novel, The Truest Pleasure (1995), garnered several honors: it was listed by Publishers Weekly as one of the outstanding books of 1995; was first runner-up for The Southern Book Critics Circle Award; and was selected as a New York Times Notable Book. His novel Gap Creek (1999) also received recognition (it was the recipient of the Southern Book Critics Circle Award for 2000, selected as a Notable Book by the New York Times, an Oprah's Book Club selection for January 2000, a New York Times best seller, and the Association of Appalachian Writers named it book of the year for 2000).

More story and poetry collections followed, among them The Balm of Gilead Tree and Other Stories, whose title story was included in the 1997 O. Henry Awards anthology, and The Strange Attractor: New and Selected Poems (2004). His latest collection of poetry, October Crossing (September 2009), has been hailed by the News & Observer's Michael Chitwood as displaying "the rich, grounded work that he does so well...There's music aplenty in Morgan's work, and his portraits not only capture the daily lives of the people of the North Carolina mountains but always manage to get at an even larger canvas, to find the common human story that we all share, no matter our particular location" ("Mountains Make Fertile Ground," News & Observer, December 13, 2009, p. D9).

Morgan's Boone: A Biography (2007), about the life of Daniel Boone, was a finalist for the Los Angeles Book Award. He has also published numerous poems, essays, and articles in a wide variety of magazines, journals, and anthologies.

Morgan has been teaching at Cornell University since 1971. He has served as the Kappa Alpha Professor of English at Cornell since 1992. He has also held numerous visiting writer and professorship positions throughout that time at a variety of institutions, including Appalachian State University, East Carolina University, Duke University, Furman University, and Davidson College.

He has received numerous honors and awards for his work, including NEA grants in 1974, 1981, and 1987. In 1988, he was awarded a Guggenheim fellowship and a Rockefeller Foundation fellowship. In 1991, he was awarded the James G. Hanes Poetry Prize by the Fellowship of Southern Writers and the North Carolina Literature Award.

He and his wife live in Ithaca, New York.


 Friends' Sponsored Activities--2009

  March 31, 2009: Spring 2009 Dinner / Lecture Program:

The Spring 2009 program featured a panel discussion with children's book illustrators Bonnie Christensen, Meredith Hamilton, and Loren Long, moderated by Barton art professor and illustrator Susan B. Fecho. While all three panelists have illustrated a variety of works in their careers, some of their best known works are the children's books they have illustrated. Moderator Susan Fecho has also illustrated children's books as well. An interesting common denominator of this event is that beyond children's book illustrations, all the panel participants share a personal Wilson, North Carolina connection.

The event was held on Tuesday, March 31, 2009, in Hardy Alumni Hall on the Barton College campus. A book signing and wine reception began at 6 pm, followed by dinner and the panel discussion at 7 pm.

  Image of author/illustrator Bonnie ChristensenPanelist Bonnie Christensen, book illustrator and author, is a native of Saranac Lake, NY. She began her career working in New York theater after earning a B.A. degree in Theatre and Communication from the University of Vermont. Her theater work included Joe Papp's Public Theatre, New York Shakespeare Festival, and others. Christensen eventually focused primarily on playwriting, and some of her plays were produced off-off-Broadway. During this time, she also worked for Screen Actors Guild and Paramount Pictures. In addition, she contributed to periodicals such as Vermont Life, National Gardening, and Ladybug.

After studying wood engraving and attending classes at Parsons School of Design and Center for Book Arts, Christensen returned to Vermont to focus on wood engraving and was offered her first illustration work. She explains her eventual emergence as a book author and illustrator: "Through a keen interest in printmaking and letterpress printing I eventually hand-printed and bound a limited-edition book. Desire to see that book reach a wider audience eventually led me to trade publishers and initiated my career," she says in Something About the Author (vol. 110, p. 41).

She authored and illustrated her first book for children in 1994, an ABC book called An Edible Alphabet, which received critical acclaim for its design and illustrations. Other books she has both written and illustrated include Rebus Riot (1997), Woody Guthrie: Poet of the People (2001), In My Grandmother's House (2003), The Daring Nellie Bly (2003), and the forthcoming Django (2009). In addition, Christensen has illustrated others' works, including award winners such as Stephen Krensky's Breaking Into Print (1996), Craig Crist Evan's Moon Over Tennessee (1999), and Mary Pope Osborne's Pompeii, Lost and Found (2006), among others.

Christensen was Guest Lecturer/Artist in Residence at the Scuola Internazionale di Grafica, in Venice, Italy and most recently has served as adjunct professor of Fine Arts at St. Michaels' College in Burlington, VT. For more information about Bonnie Christensen, visit her web site.

Wilson Connection: Bonnie has recently relocated to Wilson, NC from Vermont.

  Panelist Meredith Hamilton has drawn and painted for numerous companies including Visa International, W. W. Norton and Doubleday. She was an art director at Newsweek and has an MFA from the School of Visual Arts in New York.

Her whimsical illustrations have been used in television ads, animations, maps, and children's books, including The Story of the Orchestra, A Child’s Introduction to Poetry, A Child’s Introduction to the Night Sky, A Child's Introduction to Ballet, and A Child's Introduction to the Environment. In addition to children's books, she has also illustrated travel, fashion, and self-help books, cookbooks, calendars, bookmarks, and stationery, as displayed on her web site.

She lives with her three children and husband in Brooklyn, New York.

Wilson Connection: Meredith is the niece of Wilson resident and arts patron and former owner of The North Star shop, Lisa Anderson.

  Image of award-winning illustrator Loren Long Panelist Loren Long, a native of Joplin, Missouri, was raised in Lexington, Kentucky. He graduated from the University of Kentucky with a BA in Graphic Design/Art Studio and went on to do graduate studies at the American Academy of Art in Chicago. After a stint working as an illustrator for the now-defunct Gibson Greeting Card company in Cincinnati, Ohio, Long gained recognition as an editorial illustrator for such magazines as Forbes, Time, and Sports Illustrated, to name a few. He has also illustrated book covers for major publishing houses and produced murals and other works of art.

But as his web site explains, he "believes his calling as a storyteller lies in illustrating children’s books, often coupling his art with iconic American literary works." His work has been described by the New York Times as exhibiting "muscular style inspired by 1930’s W.P.A. murals," as well as reflecting the influence of the work of Thomas Hart Benton and Grant Wood.

Long has illustrated a number of children's books, including those by well-known authors and celebrities:

  • Madonna's Mr. Peabody's Apples (New York Times bestseller)
  • Angela Johnson's I Dream of Trains (2003 Golden Kite Award for best picture book illustration)
  • Walt Whitman's When I Heard the Learn'd Astronomer (2004 Golden Kite Honor and 2004 Parent's Choice Gold Award)
  • A new edition of Watty Piper's The Little Engine that Could (New York Times bestseller)
  • The adult gift book version of Frank McCourt's Angela and the Baby Jesus
  • Randall de Sève's Toy Boat (2007 Publishers Weekly Cuffie Award)
Many of these have garnered awards or achieved best-seller status. In addition, he has co-written and has illustrated three of the planned six chapter books in the Slugger (formerly Barnstormer) series (New York Times bestselling serial) with fellow vintage baseball buff Phil Bildner. He has also collaborated with fellow illustrators David Shannon and David Gordon to design children's author Jon Scieszka's Trucktown series aimed at the pre-reading audience.

His latest published work, released in October 2008 in time for the holiday season, is the first picture book that he not only illustrated but also authored solo--Drummer Boy--adapted from the classic Christmas song, "The Drummer Boy." His next book, Otis the Tractor, which he also wrote and illustrated, is scheduled for release in Fall 2009.

He makes his home in West Chester, Ohio, with his wife Tracy and their two sons, Griffith and Graham.

Wilson Connection: Loren is the first cousin of Barton College education professor Dave Dolman.

  Moderator Susan B. Fecho received her Master of Fine Arts in Studio Art from East Carolina University. Although only a full-time Barton faculty member since 1997, she has over twenty years' experience teaching and working with art students in the United States and abroad.

She works professionally in the field of design, digital imaging, and mixed media and exhibits regionally and nationally in galleries, colleges and universities, and museums. She has published illustrations, designs, and photographs, and her work has been accepted into several major collections: The Smithsonian Institution's American Art Museum/National Portrait Gallery Library (Washington, DC), the Word and Image Department, Victoria and Albert Museum (London, England), the Zimmerli Art Museum, NAWA Collection, Rutgers University (New Jersey), and the Museum of Women Artists (Washington, DC).

Her most recently published work includes the illustrations in a new children's book, The Day Anna Ganna Bandanna Learned to Fly, one of a planned series written by Dr. Vernon Lindquist, former Vice President for Academic Affairs at Barton College.

Wilson Connection: Although she is a resident of Tarboro, NC, Susan not only works at Barton College, but she has also exhibited her work and participated in the Wilson County art scene.

  May 1, 2009: Special Friends Program: "War Bonds: The Songs and Letters of World War II"

Image of Serena Ebhardt and David zum Brunnen, stars of 'War Bonds'The Friends of Hackney Library sponsored a special program on Friday, May 1, 2009 in Hardy Alumni Hall. The program, which drew 125 attendees (including students from director of theater Adam Twiss's theater class), featured a wine reception at 6:30 p.m., followed by dinner and a performance of War Bonds: The Songs and Letters of World War II at 7:00 p.m.

War Bonds, a musical journey through a war that redefined the world, was performed by husband-and-wife acting/singing duo David zum Brunnen and Serena Ebhardt (of EbzB Productions), who also arranged the show. The multimedia family-friendly program explored "the dark side of war and the strange juxtaposition of the light hearted, popular tunes of the time" through 22 familiar World War II-era songs, veterans' actual letters from the front (including zum Brunnen's father's, whose correspondence provided impetus for the show's creation), and headline news of the period. The War Bonds production has toured across the nation, and an edited-for-television version was filmed by UNC-TV and premiered in December 2007.

Serena Ebhardt, a Raleigh, North Carolina native, received her BA in Dramatic Art from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and attended the North Carolina Governor's School in Drama. She has acted in and/or produced over 175 professional stage plays and is a member of Actors' Equity Association and Canadian Actors' Equity Association. In addition to stage work, she has also appeared in feature films, television, commercials, industrials, and has done voice-overs. She is a recipient of the International Television and Video Association Silver Reel Award.

David zum Brunnen hails from Salisbury, North Carolina, and also received his degree (in Broadcast Journalism) from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He has performed in numerous local, national, and international productions. In addition to his performance skills, he has also served as General Manager for several theater companies and as Executive Director of the North Carolina Theatre Conference. He has received two INDIE awards for enhancing the cultural life in the Triangle.

Ebhardt and zum Brunnen live in Chatham County with their young son, Carlton.

  Clip art image of a pocket watch May 14-19, 2009: "Study 'Round the Clock" -- Library Open 24/7 During Exams

Due to popular student demand, our previous "Late Night at the Library" events held during the past several exam periods were expanded greatly for this spring's exams. While the "Late Night" events featured the library's closing at 2 am one night, during this semester's exams, the library was instead open 24/7 for much of the exam period.

The library was open during the following hours during Reading Day/Exams:

  • Thursday, May 14 and Friday, May 15: From 8 am Thursday until 8 pm Friday
  • Saturday, May 16: 10 am - 7 pm
  • Sunday, May 17-Tuesday, May 19: Open 2 pm Sunday and remain open until closing at 11 pm Tuesday
  • Wednesday, May 20: 8 am - 5 pm

These hours represented an additional 27 hours during which the library was open per exam period over regular semester hours, and 24 more than previous single "Late Night" events.

During these 24/7 periods, library services were available from 8 am until midnight only. From midnight until 8 am the following morning, no library services were available, but a security officer was on hand during that time. (Access was limited to Barton students only during the midnight to 8 am time slots--Barton ID was required for admission). The event was sponsored by the Friends of Hackney Library, the Barton College Office of Student Affairs, and the Student Government Association.

  August 27, 2009: Fall Open House--"The Band Book Tour"

Logo for Hackney Library's 'The Band Book Tour'For its fourth annual Open House on Thursday, August 27, The Friends of Hackney Library organization presented a very special event from 4-7 pm: "The Band Book Tour," featuring live music from three bands with various Barton ties, plus food, prizes, and giveaways from local businesses. The bands featured included the following:

The Near Myths, featuring Barton's own English Professor Jim Clark and friends;
The Ramonas, featuring Hackney Library's weekend librarian Tempie Hayes and friends;
Triple Wide, featuring Hackney Library's circulation supervisor Steven Stewart and friends; and
Uncle Porter, featuring Barton's Mass Communications Associate Professor Webster Struthers and friends (This band was unable to make it due to illness.)

The bands played in rotation from 4:00-7:00 pm, and dinner was served outside the library by Aramark to Barton students on the meal plan and others as well. The bands performed inside the library, where dessert was served.

The theme of the 2009 Open House riffed on the American Library Association's annual Banned Books Week campaign, sponsored each September to celebrate intellectual freedom and to decry various challenges through the years to ban certain books because of their content. In addition to the music, one of the activities during the Open House included a contest in which prizes were awarded to winners who guessed correctly the characters/locations of various challenged books.

Many thanks to the following additional sponsors for making this special Open House possible:

Fifty Fifty Lounge and Grill
f.y.e.: for your entertainment
Luna Bean Coffee Shop
Miller Music Center
Professor O'Cools of Wilson, NC
Quince: "A Southern Bistro"
The Rib Hut
Subs Plus
Torero's Mexican Grill

The following comments from Open House attendees indicated that this may be our most popular Open House yet:

  • "Best Yet (past 3 years)"
  • "Great! Way cool!! Most Excellent!!"
  • "It was GREAT"
  • "Yo! Great--MAKE IT MONTHLY!"
  • "AWESOME!"
  • "Fantastic! The BEST one ever!"
  • "Cool and funky smooth"
  • etc....

  October 6, 2009: Fall 2009 Dinner / Lecture Program

Image of author James W. Hall The Fall 2009 lecture featured Edgar-award winning author James W. Hall, whose novels include Under Cover of Daylight (1987), Bones of Coral (1992), Blackwater Sound (2002), Off the Chart (2003), Forests of the Night (2004), and Magic City (2007), to name a few. His latest is Hell's Bay (2008).

The program was held on Tuesday, October 6, 2009, in Hardy Alumni Hall on the Barton College campus. A book signing and wine reception began at 6 pm, followed by dinner and the program at 7 pm.

Born in Kentucky but a long-time Florida resident, Hall is best known for his series of ten crime novels (of fifteen total thus far) featuring the hard-bitten, reclusive character Thorn, usually set in south Florida locales. According to Hall's FAQ page, the Thorn character is a combination of several people, both real and fictional: "A neighbor of mine in Key Largo many years ago heavily influenced his creation....There’s also a little Travis McGee [fictional detective of author John D. MacDonald, who influenced Hall's writing] in him of course. And he’s a loner like I am, someone who spends a great deal of time in a room crafting small beautiful objects (fishing flies) that only a few people in the world truly appreciate." The latest of the books to feature Thorn is Hell's Bay.

A number of Hall's works have garnered such awards as the John D. MacDonald Award, the San Francisco Review of Books Critic's Choice Award, and the Shamus award for best P.I. novel. In addition, several of his books have been chosen as Literary Guild and Book-of-the-Month Club selections and have been translated into a dozen languages. But fiction is not the only genre in which he works; Hall has written four books of poetry, collections of short stories (one of which, "The Catch," received the 2006 Edgar Allan Poe Award for best short story) and a collection of essays, as well as two screenplay adaptations for his books. He has also contributed to a variety of periodicals, including American Scholar, Antioch Review, Georgia Review, Kenyon Press, North American Review, Poetry, and Southern Poetry Review.

Hall holds a B.A. degree in literature from Eckerd College (formerly Florida Presbyterian College) in St. Petersburg, an M.A. in creative writing from Johns Hopkins, and a Ph.D. in literature and creative writing from the University of Utah. He has been teaching literature and creative writing at Florida International University in Miami for over three decades. One of his more celebrated former students is author Dennis Lehane (Mystic River; The Given Day), although Hall claims no credit in his success: "With a guy like Dennis, a good student, very well-read and opinionated, it was clear he didn't need a lot of guidance -- I'm just glad I managed not to screw him up" ("Wingnut with a Keyboard", an interview with Hall by Kevin Burton Smith in January Magazine, March 2005).

According to entries in Hall's Guest Book, he is working on a new Thorn novel called Silencer. At the program, he shared that he is also working on a book about 12 best-selling works of fiction and the ten characteristics they share. It is due for publication within the next 12 months or so.

  December 8, 2009: Book Signing: Featuring Illustrator and Author Bonnie Christensen, and Her Latest Children's Book, Django

Image of author/illustrator Bonnie Christensen The Friends of Hackney Library hosted a book signing and reception for author and illustrator Bonnie Christensen. (Christensen recently participated as a panelist on the Friends' Spring 2009 panel of children's book illustrators.) The event, which was free and open to the public as well as the Barton community, was held in Hackney Library from 4-6 pm on Tuesday, December 8. Light refreshments were served to some 50 attendees.

Bonnie's latest work is Django: World's Greatest Jazz Guitarist, which debuted in September 2009. Django Reinhardt, who as a child taught himself to play guitar and began to make his living on the streets of Paris and in jazz clubs, suffered severe burns as a teenager to his hands after a tragic fire that doctors thought would put an end to his budding musical career. But he persevered and proved the doctors spectacularly wrong, becoming one of the world's most renowned jazz guitarists.

Image of the cover of Christensen's picture book, 'Django' The book has garnered early praise: As Publishers Weekly's review of Christensen's picture book explains, "Richly expressive paint and ink illustrations portray the hard-earned successes of Django Reinhardt, whose childhood was spent traveling with his impoverished gypsy family, where music was a constant and illuminating presence....A sensuous tribute to an illustrious musician" (PW, August 10, 2009, p. 56). School Library Journal's starred review of the book says that Christensen "includes enough detail to give perspective, but it is her lush paintings that so effectively give life to the man's effervescent charm and determined courage" (SLJ, September 2009, p. 139). And Booklist's starred review has this to say: "Christensen supports the inspirational story with rich, vibrant paintings that capture the texture and tone of the landscapes in Django’s life: burnt oranges and various shades of brown bring the Gypsy campfires to vivid life, while bright blues shimmering under the sharp yellows of stage footlights depict the electricity of the guitarist in performance" (Bill Ott, Booklist Online).

One of Christensen's paintings from Django is currently in a show at the Society of Illustrators in New York, to which Christensen has just been elected a member; she joins the ranks of that organization whose early members included Howard Pyle, N.C. Wyeth, Maxfield Parrish, and Frederic Remington.

Copies of Django and Christensen's other works were available for purchase and signing at the event.

Christensen began her career working in New York theater after earning a B.A. degree in Theatre and Communication from the University of Vermont. Her theater work included Joe Papp's Public Theatre, New York Shakespeare Festival, and others. Christensen eventually focused primarily on playwriting, and some of her plays were produced off-off-Broadway. During this time, she also worked for Screen Actors Guild and Paramount Pictures.

After studying wood engraving and attending classes at Parsons School of Design and Center for Book Arts, Christensen returned to Vermont to focus on wood engraving and was offered her first illustration work. She explains her eventual emergence as a book author and illustrator: "Through a keen interest in printmaking and letterpress printing I eventually hand-printed and bound a limited-edition book. Desire to see that book reach a wider audience eventually led me to trade publishers and initiated my career," she says in Something About the Author (vol. 110, p. 41).

She authored and illustrated her first book for children in 1994, an ABC book called An Edible Alphabet, which received critical acclaim for its design and illustrations. Other books she has both written and illustrated include Rebus Riot (1997), Woody Guthrie: Poet of the People (2001), In My Grandmother's House (2003), The Daring Nellie Bly (2003), and the forthcoming Fabulous: A Portrait of Andy Warhol (2011). In addition, Christensen has illustrated others' works, including award winners such as Stephen Krensky's Breaking Into Print (1996), Craig Crist Evan's Moon Over Tennessee (1999), Mary Pope Osborne's Pompeii, Lost and Found (2006), and the forthcoming Princess of Borscht (2011) by Leda Schubert.

In addition to her books, she has contributed to periodicals such as Vermont Life, National Gardening, and Ladybug.

Christensen was Guest Lecturer/Artist in Residence at the Scuola Internazionale di Grafica, in Venice, Italy and served as adjunct professor of Fine Arts at St. Michaels' College in Burlington, VT. Bonnie currently resides in Wilson, North Carolina.

For more information about Bonnie Christensen and her work, visit her web site.

  Clip art image of a pocket watch December 10-15, 2009: "Study 'Round the Clock" -- Library Open 24/7 During Exams

Due to popular student demand and the success of the Spring 2009 event, Hackney Library's "Study 'Round the Clock" returned during final exams in December. As before, for much of this exam period, the library remained open 24/7.

The library was open during the following hours during Reading Day/Exams:

  • Thursday, December 10 (Reading Day) and Friday, December 11: From 8 am Thursday until 6 pm Friday
  • Saturday, December 12: 10 am - 5 pm
  • Sunday, December 13-Wednesday, December 16: Open 2 pm Sunday and remain open continuously until closing at 6 pm Wednesday
  • Thursday, December 17 and Friday, December 18: 8 am - 5 pm

"Study 'Round the Clock" provided an additional 38 hours of study time during exam period compared to the regular semester. One hundred and thirteen students total took advantage of the extended hours during the event.

During these 24/7 periods, library services were available from 8 am until midnight only. From midnight until 8 am the following morning, no library services were available, but a police officer was on hand providing security during that time. (Access was limited to Barton students only during the midnight to 8 am time slots. Barton ID was required for admission from midnight until 8 am).

The event was sponsored by the Friends of Hackney Library, the Barton College Office of Student Affairs, and the Barton Student Government Association, and Hackney Library. In January 2010, the American Library Association announced that the event would be receiving the Association's much-coveted John Cotton Dana Award for Public Relations, the lone academic library among five other 2010 recipients.


  Friends' Sponsored Activities--2008

  February 26, 2008: Book Signing: Jim Clark, author of "Notions: A Jim Clark Miscellany"

Image of author and musician Jim ClarkThe Friends of Hackney Library and the Barton College Department of English and Modern Languages sponsored a book signing and reception featuring Barton's own Dr. James A. (Jim) Clark, writer and musician. Jim is currently the Elizabeth H. Jordan Professor of Southern Literature and Writer-in-Residence at Barton College, where he is also Director of the Barton College Creative Writing Symposium. The event, which was free and open to the public, was held on Tuesday, February 26 from 5:30-7:00 pm in Hackney Library.

A Tennessee native, Jim is the author of several works of prose and poetry, including his latest, Notions: A Jim Clark Miscellany, a collection of prose and poems from 1983-2006. Other works include two books of poems (Dancing on Canaan's Ruins and Handiwork) and a play, The Girl With the Faraway Eye. He has also served as editor of a poetry collection, Fable in the Blood: The Selected Poems of Byron Herbert Reece, and several literary journals, including The Denver Quarterly, The Greensboro Review, and The Vanderbilt Poetry Review.

Jim received his B.A. in English from Vanderbilt University, an M.F.A. in creative writing from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and his Ph.D. in modern literature and creative writing from the University of Denver.

In addition to communicating through the written word, Jim also communicates through music, including singing and playing guitar, banjo, mountain dulcimer, and autoharp. The event also featured a performance, including songs from his group's (The Near Myths) latest CD, "Words to Burn," which was released on January 28, 2008. Other CDs include Wilson and Buried Land.

  April 8, 2008: Spring 2008 Dinner / Lecture Program

Image of author John Hart The Spring 2008 program featured John Hart, author of two New York Times best-sellers: his debut novel, The King of Lies, as well as his second, Down River.

The event was held on Tuesday, April 8, 2008, in Hardy Alumni Hall on the Barton College campus. A book signing and wine reception began at 6 pm, followed by dinner and the program at 7 pm.

Author Pat Conroy says Hart's debut novel "moves and reads like a book on fire" and calls Hart "an amazing new talent." The New York Times's Janet Maslin calls King of Lies a "seething, roiling, boiling North Carolina murder story [that] crossbreeds enough Grisham-style intrigue and Turow-style brooding to make for a sulfurous mix." Entertainment Weekly says, "In a top-notch debut, Hart's prose is like Raymond Chandler's, angular and hard." And the St. Louis Post-Dispatch claims the novel "pulls off the almost impossible: It makes you like a lawyer."

King of Lies has been selected as an Editor’s Pick by the Mystery Guild and as a Featured Alternate by the Doubleday Book Club, the Book-of-the-Month Club, the Literary Guild, and Smart Reader Rewards. The book, winner of the Gumshoe Award for Best First Novel and nominated for several other awards, is also being adapted as a feature film.

A native of Durham, North Carolina who later moved to Salisbury (the setting of the book), John Hart holds a bachelor's degree in French literature from Davidson College, a master's degree in accounting from UNC-Chapel Hill, and a law degree from Franklin Pierce Law Center. He has worked as a banker, a stockbroker, and an attorney, but took a year off to realize his only dream: "to write well and to be published well." As he describes on his web site, Hart "spent the better part of a year in a carrel at the Rowan County Public Library. The King of Lies is the result." After a brief stint with Merrill Lynch in Greensboro after the completion of King of Lies, Hart received an advance that allowed him to work on his next two books full time.

His highly-anticipated second novel, Down River, was released October 2, 2007 and has garnered even more praise than his debut work. It has been chosen as a main selection of the Book-of-the-Month Club and as a featured alternate for the Literary Guild, the Mystery Guild, and the Doubleday Book Club. Publishers Weekly, Booklist, and Library Journal have all given Hart's second work of fiction starred reviews. The following summary of the novel, which is also set in Rowan County, appears on Hart's web site:

    "Adam Chase has a violent streak, and not without reason. His life was all but destroyed at an early age. As a grown man, he's passionate and misunderstood, a fighter. When narrowly acquitted of a murder charge, he disappears for five long years: not a clue, not a trace. Now, he's back and nobody knows why, not his family or the cops, not the woman he left behind. When bodies start turning up, Adam finds himself embroiled in the fight of his life, not just to prove his own innocence, but to reclaim what he lost so many years ago."

Publishers Weekly says "This book should settle once and for all the question of whether thrillers and mysteries can also be literature."

  May 11, 2008: "Late Night at the Library"

During final exams on Sunday, May 11, the Library held its second "Late Night at the Library" event, staying open until 2:00 AM in the morning. In response to student requests for later hours during exams, Late Night debuted during the Fall 2007 semester, and thanks to its success, it was held again this spring. Reference and other services were limited from 11 pm to 2 am, but there was plenty of opportunity and space for students to prepare for final exams.

The event was sponsored by the Friends of Hackney Library and included refreshments provided by Tony Tilley and Aramark.

  August 28, 2008: Fall Library Open House

Clip art image of popcornClose to 100 Barton students, faculty, and staff attended Hackney Library's third annual Fall Open House on Thursday, August 28, from 4-6 pm. The event, sponsored by the Friends of Hackney Library, featured food and giveaways such as dry erase boards and squeezable bulldog stress relievers. The real-live Barton bulldog mascot, Bully, made an appearance as well!

Screenings of the library's new orientation video (complete with popcorn!) were shown at 4:00, 4:30, 5:00, and 5:30 pm during the Open House for those who wanted to view it. A drawing for 10 flash drives took place following each screening.

In addition, drawings for pre-paid Visa cards of $25 each as well as other door prizes (Barton umbrellas, water bottles, tee shirts, pendants, bags, and free movie passes from Carmike Theater) were also held following the event. Many thanks to the Friends of Hackney Library, Carmike Theater, and the Barton Student Government Association for sponsorship and door prizes!

  September 17, 2008: Constitution Day Program

In celebration of Constitution Day 2008, the Friends of Hackney Library sponsored a special program on Wednesday, September 17, 2008 featuring a reception and a lecture on constitutional issues given by The Honorable William G. Stewart, NC District Court Judge, District 7. The event was held on the first floor of Hackney Library. Following a reception beginning at 5:00 pm, the lecture, entitled "The Constitution: Everyday Applications," began at 6:00 pm.

A native of Fremont, Judge Stewart is the son of the late Jessie and Jesse Stewart. He completed a Bachelor of Arts degree in Journalism at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1972 and served six years in the Army Reserve following graduation. He also was employed by the Smithfield Herald newspaper for a year before entering the classroom to teach English and French, while coaching football at Charles B. Aycock, his high school alma mater.

Upon completion of his law degree at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 1978, Judge Stewart began his law practice with the firm Parker, Miles, and Hinson. He later served as Clerk of Superior Court for Wilson County before returning to private practice for three years with Narron, Holdford, Babb, Harrison, and Rhodes. He later ran his own law firm until 1990, when he began service as Assistant District Attorney. Judge Stewart served in this role until his election in 2000 as District Court Judge to the 7th Judicial District for the state of North Carolina, in which he currently serves Wilson, Nash and Edgecombe counties.

The Constitution Day reception and lecture were free and open to both the Barton community and the community at large.

  October 14, 2008: Fall 2008 Dinner / Lecture Program

Image of author David Payne The Fall 2008 lecture featured novelist David Payne, author of Confessions of a Taoist on Wall Street (1984), Early from the Dance (1989), Ruin Creek (1993), Gravesend Light (2000), and Back to Wando Passo (2006).

The program was held on Tuesday, October 14, 2008, in Hardy Alumni Hall on the Barton College campus. A book signing and wine reception began at 6 pm, followed by dinner and the program at 7 pm.

David Payne was born in Henderson, North Carolina in 1955. He attended the Phillips Exeter Academy in New Hampshire and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, graduating with highest honors in creative writing in 1977.

After college, Payne spent a year working on fishing trawlers out of Wanchese, NC, and, later, Point Judith, Rhode Island—experiences that would later underlie the commercial fishing scenes in his fourth novel, Gravesend Light, which was named one of the top books of the year by the Christian Science Monitor.

Following his fishing experiences, he spent time traveling the world. An episode of Louis Rukeyser's Wall Street Week 1980 TV show planted the seeds that would eventually inspire Payne to write his first novel, Confessions of a Taoist on Wall Street, which the Washington Post describes as "a book to be read twice, first to be gulped down in great chunks during sleepless nights; later to be sipped slowly, savoring details, like a well-brewed cup of tea." The success of Confessions (winner of the Houghton Mifflin Literary Fellowship Award) allowed him to write full time. He has also taught at such institutions as Bennington, Duke, and Queens University of Charlotte.

His subsequent three novels (Early from the Dance, Ruin Creek, and Gravesend Light) all share settings (and in some cases, characters) in the fictional Piedmont town of Killdeer, NC and on the Outer Banks.

Payne's fifth novel, Back to Wando Passo, is set on a rice plantation in Lowcountry South Carolina and features two related love triangles that take place there--one set in the present and the other during the Civil War. Pat Conroy says of this novel, "Back to Wando Passo quivers with authentic life and is so bold in concept and audacious in scope that it seems like the summing up and exclamation point of a great writer's career. The novel contains everything."

Payne, who lives in North Carolina with his wife and two children, is currently working on a memoir.

  December 14, 2008: "Late Night at the Library"

On Sunday, December 14, 2008 during final exam week, the Library held its third "Late Night at the Library" event, staying open until 2:00 AM. This stress-busting event was designed not only to give students plenty of time to study for exams but also to offer some study breaks complete with refreshments from the incomparable Tony Tilley & Aramark.

The Friends of Hackney Library sponsored the event, as they have all previous "Late Night" events. Reference and other services were limited from 11 pm to 2 am, but there was plenty of opportunity and space to prepare for final exams. Also, extra security was on hand during the hours of 11 pm to 2 am to provide escorts to on-campus destinations.


 Friends' Sponsored Activities--2007

  February 21, 2007: Book Signing: Jeff Broadwater, George Mason, Forgotten Founder

Image of Dr. Jeff Broadwater On Wednesday, February 21, from 5-7 pm in Hackney Library, the Friends of Hackney Library and the Wilson County Historical Association jointly sponsored a reception and book signing featuring Barton College's Dr. Jeff Broadwater and his latest book, George Mason, Forgotten Founder (UNC Press, 2006).

Open to the public as well as to the Barton community, the event featured heavy hors d'oeuvres and the opportunity to purchase copies of the book and have them signed by the author himself. Around 6:00 pm, Dr. Broadwater gave a few brief remarks as well.

The Washington Post's Jonathan Yardley calls Dr. Broadwater's latest "an exemplary biography," and Publishers Weekly states, "Broadwater's prose is vigorous and his assessment of Mason judicious; this biography is a standout."

  April 10, 2007: Spring 2007 Dinner / Lecture Program

On Tuesday, April 10, 2007, the Friends' Spring program took its lead from the Barton College NCAA Division II National Basketball Championship victory over Winona State University in the electrifying final 45-seconds of the game.

The Friends program, dubbed "Full Court Press," was held in Hardy Alumni Hall on the Barton College campus. A wine reception began at 6 pm, followed by dinner and the program at 7 pm. The program consisted of a panel discussion moderated by Barton College alumnus and trustee Russell Rawlings, who is currently the director of communications of the NC Bar Association.

Panelists included Michael Lindsay, sports writer for the Wilson Daily Times; Mike Charbonneau, news reporter for WRAL-TV; Mike Bogen, sports writer for The Republican newspaper in Springfield, Massachusetts (where the history-making game took place during the Elite Eight tournament); Lorenzo Perez, sports writer for The News & Observer newspaper in Raleigh; and Alton Britt of Wilson, the "voice of Bulldog Basketball." The panelists, who all covered the Bulldogs winning season's 'David versus Goliath'-like finale, carried on a lively discussion about the unique world of sports journalism and its effect on teams and their fans, as illustrated by the Bulldogs' taking of the national title against tremendous odds.

  August 30, 2007: Fall Library Open House

Clip art image of party itemsHackney Library held its second annual Open House on Thursday, August 30, from 4-6 pm. The event featured food and giveaways such as stress-relieving squeezable Barton bulldogs, pens, bookmarks, and award-winning dry-erase boards. Tours of the library were available attendees.

  September 17, 2007: Constitution Day Program

Image of constitutional scholar and author Kevin McGuire In celebration of Constitution Day 2007, the Friends of Hackney Library sponsored a special program on Monday, September 17, 2007 featuring speaker Kevin T. McGuire, associate professor in the department of political science at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Following a reception from 6:30 to 7:00 pm on the first floor of Hackney Library, Mr. McGuire presented a lecture concerning constitutional issues, followed by a question-and-answer period.

Mr. McGuire teaches and conducts research on the American judiciary, with a primary interest in the U.S. Supreme Court. His book The Supreme Court Bar: Legal Elites in the Washington Community, an analysis of the participation and influence of Washington-based lawyers who specialize in litigating before the high court, received the Choice Outstanding Academic Book Award as well as being honored by the Law and Courts Section of the American Political Science Association.

Mr. McGuire has also written and edited several textbooks, including his most recent, The Judicial Branch, which he co-edited as part of Oxford University Press's Institutions of American Democracy series. In addition, his research has been published in numerous journals, such as the American Political Science Review, the American Journal of Political Science, and the Journal of Politics.

A former Fulbright Scholar at Trinity College, Dublin, Mr. McGuire received his BA degree from West Virginia University and his Ph.D. from Ohio State University. Among other awards, he has twice received the American Judicature Society Award and has also received the McGraw-Hill Award for work on public opinion and the Supreme Court.

The Constitution Day reception and lecture were free and open to both the Barton community and the community at large.

  October 2, 2007: Fall 2007 Dinner / Lecture Program

Image of author Don Brown The Fall 2007 lecture featured Don Brown, a former Navy JAG Officer and the author of Zondervan's Navy Justice Series: Treason (2005), Hostage (2005), Defiance (2006), and the latest novel in the series, Black Sea Affair (cover shot), released in January 2008.

The program was held on Tuesday, October 2, 2007, in Hardy Alumni Hall on the Barton College campus. A book signing and wine reception began at 6 pm, to be followed by dinner and the program at 7 pm.

A Washington County, North Carolina native, Don Brown received his Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of North Carolina and received a Juris Doctor degree from Campbell University School of Law. He continued his studies at the United States Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island, earning the Navy's nonresident certificate in International Law. Mr. Brown spent five years in the U.S. Navy as an officer in the Judge Advocate General's (JAG) Corps. During that time, he served with the U.S. Attorney, served in the Pentagon, and was published in the Naval Law Review. He was also a recipient of the Navy Achievement Medal, the Navy Commendation Medal, and the National Defense Service Medal.

Mr. Brown spent several years as a Navy JAG Prosecutor before becoming Special Assistant to the United States Attorney in the southern district of California, but returned to North Carolina in 1992, practicing law with two Charlotte area law firms, and then founding his own firm, Brown & Associates PLLC, in 1996. He remained on inactive status with the Navy through 1999, rising to the rank of Lieutenant Commander.

Mr. Brown has personal connections to Barton College (formerly Atlantic Christian College, founded by the Disciples of Christ [Christian] denomination); not only did he grow up in a Disciples of Christ congregation in Eastern North Carolina, but his father is also a Barton/ACC alumnus, and we were delighted to have the opportunity to host Don on campus.

  November 15, 2007: Book Signing: William Powell, Editor, Encyclopedia of North Carolina

Image of Encyclopedia of North Carolina editor, William Powell; photo by Laura BrubakerThe Friends of Hackney Library, the Friends of the Wilson County Public Library, and the Wilson County Historical Association sponsored a book signing and reception featuring William S. Powell, editor of the Encyclopedia of North Carolina. Long considered the "dean" of North Carolina history, Dr. Powell was on hand from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. on Thursday, November 15, 2007 in Hackney Library to sign copies of the book, which were sold during the event.

The Encyclopedia, published by UNC Press (2006) in association with the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, features over 2,000 entries on 1,360 pages covering the entire history and culture of North Carolina. The single-volume work is the final installment of a series of three works edited by Powell that includes The North Carolina Gazetteer (1968) and the Dictionary of North Carolina Biography (six volumes, 1979-96), also published by UNC Press.

"The encyclopedia belongs in every home and every library. It's that important," says William Friday, former president of the University of North Carolina system.

The event was free and open to the public.

  December 13, 2007: "Late Night at the Library"

On December 13, 2007, the first night of exams, the Library held its first "Late Night at the Library" event, staying open until 2:00 AM in the morning. In response to student requests for later hours during exams, this stress-busting event was designed not only to give students plenty of time to study for exams but also to offer some study breaks, including hot chocolate and cookies from the incomparable Tony Tilley & Aramark.

The Friends of Hackney Library, who sponsored the event, also managed to arrange for the delivery of a new "litter" of stress-busting squeezable Barton bulldogs (wildly popular during their debut at this fall's Library Open House) to be given away as well. Reference and other services were limited from 11 pm to 2 am, but there was plenty of opportunity and space for students to prepare for final exams.


Last updated May 21, 2013